Published by Team Motoroids | March 3, 2021 in News

Hero Glamour BS6 Review : A Glamourous Hero?

The BS6 Hero Glamour arrived with a host of changes and we recently got to ride this stylish 125cc commuter to figure out if it is still as desirable and practical as it was before.

Post the implementation of the BS6 era when Hero brought out the BS6 Avatar of its popular Glamour, it received quite some changes. The motorcycle was redesigned, the frame was new, the engine was new with fuel injection, there was more ground clearance, more suspension travel and a host of other changes as well. Let’s dive deep into the BS6 Glamour which a lot of you had requested us for.

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Design and practicality

The design is quite a bit reminiscent of the earlier design template of the Glamour. You still get the chequered style design on the Glamour, now with dual-tone contrast to oomph the appeal. Speaking of dual-tone, you now get 4 colour scheme options – Red, Blue, Grey and Candy Red although additionally you also get a blaze special edition that comes with a grey and yellow dual-tone combo.

The design styling is majorly 2-tone. The major body is monochromatic, barring the mid-section which also houses the chequered graphics and the fenders which are finished in black to provide the dual-tone finish. The front upper half and the tail section is blacked out and so is the exhaust.

The headlight and the pilot lights upfront are halogens and the headlight unit is an always-on unit. The indicators also have bulbs and this motorcycle doesn’t feature LED lighting of any sort. We believe that had Hero went ahead and provided LED lights on a 125 commuter motorcycle, it could have further helped the Glamour stand out. A missed opportunity maybe.

Practically, from the sides, it looks quite neat actually. The Glamour rides on 18″ tyres at the front as well as rear. Seat height stands at 790mm and a 5-foot-5, 5-foot-6 guy would also be able to reach the ground comfortably. We would have appreciated it if the seat height had been further lower as the commuter segment witnesses considerably short as well as considerably tall riders so should the seat height be further reduced, it could be easy for shorter riders to ride as well. The seat also could have been wider and better put together.

Moving further up, the fuel tank capacity is 10 litres. The fuel lid comes off completely as it is not hinged and can gulp in 10 litres of fuel which frankly could have been more. On the other hand, the knee recesses are quite accommodating and feel ergonomically fine.

Rider’s point of view

From a rider’s point of view, you get a digital analogue digital cluster with no tachometer. You get tell-tale lights all over and all the necessary bits are conveniently displayed. You also get an average fuel efficiency indicator which although unfortunately, displays instantaneous fuel efficiency and not overall average fuel efficiency. A side-stand indicator is also visible in the cluster but even with the side stand down, you can start the motorcycle.

 

Talking about switchgear, on the right you get an i3s switch along with the ignition switch and on the left, you get a high/low beam toggle, indicator switch, flasher and horn. Kill switch and hazard light button could have been provided as well. The overall switchgear quality is decent, nothing extraordinary. The mirrors provide a good view of what’s around and are very practical to use.

Performance

The engine is almost a 125cc unit which delivers 10.87 PS of peak power @7500 RPM and 10.6Nm of peak torque @6000 RPM and this engine is mated to a 5-speed gearbox. The peak output figures are not segment-leading though. Any which ways, the BS6 Glamour can do 37kph in 1st gear, 59 kph is 2nd gear, 80kph in 3rd gear, 100kph in 4th gear and it can pull all the way to its top speed of 115kph in the 5th gear. Talking about tractability, it can pull clean from 20, 25 and 30 kph in 3rd, 4th and 5th gear respectively so it is quite a tractable engine.  and 5th gear respectively, without knocking. So, in that sense, the engine is a tractable unit. Despite being a tractable unit, the low-end torque isn’t quite good, although it does roll and pull in a higher gear at low speeds, but the initial pull is not that great. Around 4000-6000 RPM it feels a lot lively and you’ll need to breach the 4000 RPM mark to extract performance out of this engine.

Additionally, you also get i3s technology which is basically a start/stop system to help conserve fuel. The i3s tech shuts off the engine when you supposedly stop and are in neutral. To crank it up again, all you have to do is pull the clutch. Furthermore, you also get an auto-sail technology that doesn’t stall your motorcycle when you travel at low speeds in higher gears.

Dynamics

The chassis, in the context of a 125cc motorcycle, is quite stiff and hence allows for a handling experience. The riding position is a bit more committed than a usual 100cc commuter. The engine is considerably refined although the noise from the engine is a slight bit rough. When you rev this motor until the limiter, only then, in those 1000-1500 RPM before the limiter kicks in, you feel some vibes on the footpegs. The modulation in the brakes is a bit different and it bites early and hence you need to get used to it for a smoother ride.

The ride quality is a bit on the firm side and commuting alone you might sometimes feel the stiffness. As a commuter motorcycle, the ride quality could have been better. As aforementioned, the travel at the front and the rear has been increased and you also get a 5-step adjustable twin-suspension setup at the rear. For an enthusiast, it does offer quite some fun and pulls reassuringly.

Fuel efficiency

It all depends on your riding style. If you wack open the throttle or are riding in traffic, you should expect 50-55 km for every litre of fuel. Out on the highways, if you ride smooth and cruise along steadily, you can expect around 65 km for every litre of fuel. It is one of the most fuel-efficient commuters in this segment.

Price

Drum variant – INR 72,000

Disc variant – INR 75,400 ( all prices, ex-showroom ). You also get a limited edition Blaze variant for an extra premium of INR 1200-1400.

Conclusion

Our main complaint would be that the ride quality could have been better especially considering the commuter segment and what other players are offering. Honda Shine and Bajaj Pulsar 125 are its primary competitors. This is a well-rounded machine, and a commuter-friendly package and Hero’s overall sales and service network is well-known and majorly hassle-free. If you want an all-round package, you should test drive the BS6 Glamour.