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Riding gear: Your second skin


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#16 satyenpoojary

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 04:39 PM

^ Have you decided on any pants?
There are neat shift 2009 series ones on BikeBandit closeouts.... I was just seeing them yesterday!

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Ride right, Ride safe, and Ride hard!


#17 sheelpriye

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 04:55 PM

if i get icon(you know the source)well and good, else Joe Rocket and Performance Racing for all gear(helmet/jacket/pant) and if i save enough by then(being too optimistic), i might go for street burners
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The bike does not define you, but the actions you perform while on the bike do.

#18 thilak

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 03:55 AM

dman said:

On our Long rides ... Say out station rides we all try and wear protective gear.

In the City for day to day riding i am sure we try and wear a Helmet, Gloves and a simple Wind Cheater.

But do we wear Shin guards ? Knee Guards ?? Elbow Guards ??? Riding Boots ???? Riding Jacket ?????

Accidents dont have a specific location, a day or a fixed time.. !!

I am asking this to know what is the minimum protection that we should have on our busy city roads ??

The day I sold my bike, was the day I bought my riding gear. Ironic, I know, but I plan of using the textile jacket + gauntlet + helmet all the time, no matter how hot or cold it gets. If I take a look at my figures, I've crashed all the time within city limits, not even once on the highways. It's advisable to wear it all the time!

satyenpoojary said:

PS: I dont consider DSG\Cramster as 'branded' riding gears in this context. Especially DSG as it has a issue with the fitting, the standard M size has long enough sleeves but a short waist and so on.
In short if you are planning to buy DSG\Cramster, you might as well try it before you book... and when you try and find a fit perfect buy THAT peice itself!

Well, DSG has known fitting and zipper issues. We've had quite good experience with Cramster. Kwofist recently crash tested his Cramster Pulse, and I must say, it saved his shoulders from dislocation and his forearms from lacerations. Good quality stuff! I personally hate DSG cause it looks like a cheap raincoat, but then again looks are subjective.


Quote

On the contrary, knee guards have a reputation to be fidgity... I gave away a pair of universal sized knee guards to a close friend in Mangalore as the didnt fit me!

They were awesome!!!! I tried it on once, good stuff. Where did you buy that from?

DineshSamtani said:

LOL nice1 satyen...

@sheelpriye : just a sugestion, try avoiding bionic knee guards from Cramster, i own one and they are a pain to wear/remove as you have to slide them via your foot, try get something that u can directly hook up to the knee and not slide.

Thanks for the info Dinesh. I was almost on the verge of picking one of those bionic knee pads for myself!
Thilak Rao
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#19 HydroXidE

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 10:35 AM

DineshSamtani said:

@sheelpriye : just a sugestion, try avoiding bionic knee guards from Cramster, i own one and they are a pain to wear/remove as you have to slide them via your foot, try get something that u can directly hook up to the knee and not slide.

I have a slightly older cramster knee guard which didn't need sliding under the foot. They come with straps that you can directly fasten over your knee without having to slide under your foot, but I'd advice against such a type.

It's great for convenience, but under harsh conditions they do tend to come loose as they are fastened only with velcro. Also, over time, they may stretch and fit loose / get loose very quickly (within an hour of riding) once you've worn them tight.

In my personal case, I've had to suffer a knee abrasion despite wearing knee guards. My riding involved standing and sitting and changing positions very often, which loosens the knee guards quickly. I had a fall and slid down a slope, on dirt, when my knee guards also slid out of position exposing my right knee.

So, among knee guards, it's advisable to just get one that is comfortable to wear for longer durations and stays in the same place and doesn't get loose over time. Even if it is not the best in terms of protection, it is still better than one which is extremely protective but has a tendency to loosen or can't be fastened properly.

#20 arn

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 01:02 PM

HydroXidE said:

I have a slightly older cramster knee guard which didn't need sliding under the foot. They come with straps that you can directly fasten over your knee without having to slide under your foot, but I'd advice against such a type.

It's great for convenience, but under harsh conditions they do tend to come loose as they are fastened only with velcro. Also, over time, they may stretch and fit loose / get loose very quickly (within an hour of riding) once you've worn them tight.

In my personal case, I've had to suffer a knee abrasion despite wearing knee guards. My riding involved standing and sitting and changing positions very often, which loosens the knee guards quickly. I had a fall and slid down a slope, on dirt, when my knee guards also slid out of position exposing my right knee.

So, among knee guards, it's advisable to just get one that is comfortable to wear for longer durations and stays in the same place and doesn't get loose over time. Even if it is not the best in terms of protection, it is still better than one which is extremely protective but has a tendency to loosen or can't be fastened properly.

Most good riding pants do have integrated knee guards, and there is no question of the knee guard moving out of position during a fall.

As mentioned above a knee guard which stays in place is very important, but IMO, even more important is the ability to absorb an impact. Most getoffs involve hitting the knee hard on the ground (along with the palms/elbow), the job of the knee guard is to protect at that moment. Of course, it will not do that if it is not on the knee at that time. However, once the initial impact is taken care of, the rest is about preventing abrasions, which is what the material of the trouser is for. If the knee guards are there, then that is fine, but it is rare to see somebody slide on the knees after that - usually, the back and hips come into acton.

Again, as mentioned, if the riding involves a lot of changes in position  (racing/off roading rallying), then it is essential that the guards don't shift, but for touring (where one is essentially sitting in the same position) even humble roller skating knee guards do a pretty good job. The elastic does loosen with time, but once one gets the hang of it, it is manageable, requires minimal adjustment, and will protect from the initial impact. Adding some extra EVA foam or even thick heatlon in an annular fashion (less in the region of the kneecap to ensure a better retention in position, and to transfer impact forces to the surrounding areas) can make it pretty much more impact absorbent.

#21 ihrishi

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 10:35 PM

Was looking at ebay and found these couple of good looking boots, at a lovely price.

Bates Military Combat Boots Leather w/ Goretex Lining - eBay (item 380176549358 end time May-09-10 11:31:04 PDT)


and

Bates 106 Lites 11? Side Zip Paratrooper Boots-Sz 8 ? R - eBay (item 110400808515 end time May-05-10 21:17:41 PDT)


They would be lovely for riding, as well as for everyday use also...
the only downside is shipping cost.. which can be brought to a more realistic figure, if we order in a group...

Let me know if anyone is interested so we can club orders...
Cheers,
Hrishi
Motorep, Mumbai
http://ihrishi.blogspot.com

#22 satyenpoojary

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 02:24 PM

I am looking for a decent street+touring boot for the Leh expedition, the one that I have had a problem of the sole (glue) coming off ...and hence is a bit risky to wear!

The problem with army\industrial safety boots is that it doesnt provide any feedback!

Any suggestions?

Life is tough, only to make you tougher!
Ride right, Ride safe, and Ride hard!


#23 motormania

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 04:04 PM

satyenpoojary said:

I am looking for a decent street+touring boot for the Leh expedition, the one that I have had a problem of the sole (glue) coming off ...and hence is a bit risky to wear!

The problem with army\industrial safety boots is that it doesnt provide any feedback!

Any suggestions?



Did you take a look at the locally available Orazo boots? and few days back i came across AXO boots for less tan 100$ on motorcyclesuperstore.com. Always keep a track of such online stores,they give some mouthwatering deals :cool:
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#24 arn

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 05:13 PM

satyenpoojary said:

I am looking for a decent street+touring boot for the Leh expedition, the one that I have had a problem of the sole (glue) coming off ...and hence is a bit risky to wear!

The problem with army\industrial safety boots is that it doesnt provide any feedback!

Any suggestions?

Try your friendly neighbourhood hiking store, and buy something one size big. You have to touch feel and try then buy.

#25 sheelpriye

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 05:21 PM

currently using these--
http://www.woodlandw...ts.aspx?coll=1#
3rd pic ankle length, very light(compared to what woodlands are)expensive(3k+)but i am happy


any review about this? seems decent--
http://www.planetdsg...lack-p-790.html
or this--
http://www.performan...s/highside.html
which seems better?

Edited by sheelpriye, 25 April 2010 - 05:25 PM.

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The bike does not define you, but the actions you perform while on the bike do.

#26 ihrishi

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 10:25 AM

satyenpoojary said:

I am looking for a decent street+touring boot for the Leh expedition, the one that I have had a problem of the sole (glue) coming off ...and hence is a bit risky to wear!

The problem with army\industrial safety boots is that it doesnt provide any feedback!

Any suggestions?

Buy the DMS - directly moulded sole - or the military shoes.
Total VFM for 500bucks.

I have been using a pair for a long time now. Now want to upgrade to something which i can wear in office also...
Cheers,
Hrishi
Motorep, Mumbai
http://ihrishi.blogspot.com

#27 satyenpoojary

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:13 PM

Arn, I saw the cramster riding boot as well, they flex so decided against it!

motormania said:

Did you take a look at the locally available Orazo boots? and few days back i came across AXO boots for less tan 100$ on motorcyclesuperstore.com. Always keep a track of such online stores,they give some mouthwatering deals :)
Orazo - seems like overrated industrial safety shoes to me!
(I keep a track of almost all closeouts :cool: ) those white boots are not for me :)

ihrishi said:

Buy the DMS - directly moulded sole - or the military shoes.
Total VFM for 500bucks.

I have been using a pair for a long time now. Now want to upgrade to something which i can wear in office also...
We went on to think to fabricate some thing to stiff up the shoe so that it doesnt flex in case of a spill... but the lack of feedback is the only issue!

Life is tough, only to make you tougher!
Ride right, Ride safe, and Ride hard!


#28 abhimanyu31

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 04:27 PM

satyenpoojary said:

We went on to think to fabricate some thing to stiff up the shoe so that it doesnt flex in case of a spill... but the lack of feedback is the only issue!

I don't know the budget for your shoes, but I would highly recommend the Sidi Street Burner shoes. They are designed to be stiff at the ankles and at the same time they will provide you with the feedback required. Performance Racing Store has them listed on their website. Highly recommended, a good one time investment that may save your ankles and toes in case of a spill..
YES - it is fast! NO you can't ride it!!!

#29 KwokFist

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 06:03 AM

abhimanyu31 said:

I don't know the budget for your shoes, but I would highly recommend the Sidi Street Burner shoes. They are designed to be stiff at the ankles and at the same time they will provide you with the feedback required. Performance Racing Store has them listed on their website. Highly recommended, a good one time investment that may save your ankles and toes in case of a spill..

Any idea about the cost for the same?

I've been using Woodland trekking shoes which are ankle length and plan on upgrading to something better later this year if budget allows and most certainly looking at an all-weather preferably "waterproof" solution.
Meghan Naik
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#30 arn

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 10:25 AM

Ankle protection is one thing, waterproof is another. You need one during 4 months only, and ankle length boots will still allow your pants/spashed water to drip into it from above.

Hiking boots (can be used off the bike too) + overshoes fit the bill for me.




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